How does your foot strike the ground when you run?

How does your foot strike the ground when you run?

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Do you know? I don’t want you to think about changing just yet, I just want to bring some awareness to it.

There’s a reason I almost never talk about foot strikes in my ChiRunning workshops. If you concentrate on the foot strike, you will mess up all the big rocks. To me, a proper foot strike is a by-product of proper posture, cadence and relaxation.

Now I don’t even think about foot strike when I run, I simply notice it falls below or behind me every time. But it took a while for me to get there.

More and more research is coming out to support a midfoot strike. That’s great but it probably won’t convince someone who’s old school and has been a heel striker for 20 years…

Even in ChiRunning, we went from talking about midfoot strike to a full foot strike now. There’s a reason for that. A lot of folks were actually running on the balls of their feet and overloading their calves. You should feel nothing in your lower leg when you run, very similar to the walking zombie exercise I do.

There’s also a difference between your heel touching the ground and heel striking. Your heel should be touching down at every step. It will be okay.

Now you just need to repeat it a few hundred or thousand times!

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I hope everyone had a great Halloween. Had too much candy? Today seems to be a perfect day/night for a run. :)

2 Responses to How does your foot strike the ground when you run?

  1. andy says:

    eric – i agree. i changed my running 5 years ago without any ‘focus’ on form – all i did was concentrate on cadence, making sure to reach 90-94 right foot strikes (or left) each minute. the rest took care of itself. interestingly, despite numerous running injuries prior to the change, i’ve remained injury free since, even as i’ve gotten MUCH faster. As you mention, the proper foot strike should sort itself out by focusing on these other variables. great post.

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